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MANGA to REALISTIC: PART SIX by FOERVRAENGD MANGA to REALISTIC: PART SIX by FOERVRAENGD
MOAR TUTORIALS/GUIDES:

PIGMENTS AND PIXELS:
Part 1:[link]
Part 2: [link]
Part 3: [link]

MANGA to REALISTIC:
Part 1: [link]
Part 2: [link]
Part 3: [link]
Part 4: [link]
Part 5: [link]
Part 6: [link]
Part 7: [link]
Part 8: [link]
Part 9: [link]
Part 10: [link]
Part 11: [link]
Part 12: [link]

UNDERSTANDING ANATOMY:
Part 1: [link]
Part 2: [link]
Part 3: [link]
Part 4: [link]
Part 5: [link]


Here is a very good video about stretching your arms the best way ----> [link] [link] [link] [link] <------ CLICK AND WATCH and you'll hopefully not hurt your precious hands anymore.

I know that the pain in the neck and the pain in your wrists can vary totally on how you sit and draw, digital artists often have a pain in their shoulder/neck while traditional artists often feel pain in their wrists/arms/hands.

If you know more websites/videos with information about ergonomics for artists, please write it as a comment here and I'll probably add it.

Final picture:

I hope this will help you guys out a bit more :)

and yes, I'd love to see your sketches. I wanna know if my teachings actually pay off!
Add a Comment:
 
:iconneusi4813:
neusi4813 Featured By Owner Sep 1, 2014  Student Digital Artist
thank you! i love this tutorial!
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:iconhappymedicine:
happymedicine Featured By Owner Aug 9, 2014
you make the best tutorial ever! very on point!
Reply
:iconpalabrasdelviento:
palabrasdelviento Featured By Owner Jul 28, 2014
I love you.
Reply
:iconsmil235:
smil235 Featured By Owner Jul 10, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I wish I could show you my sketch but I don't have printer. I didn't quite follow your tutorial but I did follow it, and I'm happy with the results! Thank you :) so much.
Reply
:iconzenilla94:
Zenilla94 Featured By Owner Jun 29, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
the stretching part will come to good use,  i have bad habit drawing many hours in row, cuz i dont  look at the time.   If i am looking at the time i draw an hour and then take break. shoulders start to hurt after an hour ofte, if i have done much drawign other days aswell will take less than 1 hour to hurt.  I dont know, maybe i dont stretch enough? ;d
Reply
:iconbadchronic:
badchronic Featured By Owner Mar 18, 2014
is there a paint program for windows that will let me fine tune the art i draw to enhance and remove blemishes ?
Reply
:iconnagase13:
Nagase13 Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
ugh i love all of your tutorials!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Reply
:iconblarbonian:
Blarbonian Featured By Owner Nov 1, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
These tutorials are very helpful! The only complaint I have is the part about blending. I'm cool with stumps, but I've always been told that fingers are a very bad way of blending. But y'know, to each their own. It doesn't look bad when you do it. When I see others do it (and looking back at when I did it) the drawing always ended up being completely smudged and ugly, the worst part being that it can't be erased.
Reply
:iconadjidaumo:
Adjidaumo Featured By Owner Jan 2, 2014  Student General Artist
I've had many art teachers tell me that using fingers to blend is bad.  I'm studying art in college now and I've discovered that this idea is wrong.
Your fingers are a tool just like a paintbrush or a stump.  As a tool, your fingers have a set of limitations that can be used to your advantage or disadvantage.

Your fingers are covered with friction ridges, or the lines that make up your finger print.  When blending pencil (or charcoal), the friction ridges help the finger to pick up a lot of the pencil (or charcoal) from off your drawing.  At first your clean fingers will pick up and remove more pencil (or charcoal) then they blend.  Once your fingers are dark and dirty, blending is easy and is affected by the pressure your fingers exert. More pressure = more pencil (or charcoal) your fingers transfer to your paper.  Your fingers secrete oils to keep your skin hydrated and to protect you from bacteria.  When mixed with pencil (or charcoal), these oils "stick" to the paper and makes any marks, blending or smudging more difficult to remove.

As long as you understand the limitations of any tool or medium you can use them to your advantage in your artwork.
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:iconblarbonian:
Blarbonian Featured By Owner Jan 3, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
I guess that makes sense. Thanks!
Reply
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